The Helios student halls of residence in Lublin have been transformed into housing for refugees.

It is where Dorota Woroniecka, who works for the Polish Centre for International Aid (PCPM), has been giving out debit cards loaded with around 710 zloty ($166 / £129) to some of the most vulnerable refugees from Ukraine.

The Multi-Purpose Cash Assistance programme, she says, is designed to give those who apply independence and dignity. Those eligible can choose how to spend the money in any EU country.

It is topped up for three months and is funded by the PCPM foundation, with support from the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) and CARE USA.

The aim is to hand out these debit cards to an initial group of 7,000 Ukrainian refugee families.

Ukrainian forces have recaptured the town of Bucha, near the capital Kyiv, its mayor has said.

“March 31 will go down in the history of our town… as the day of its liberation from Russian (forces),” Mayor Anatolii Fedoruk said in a video on Friday, which appeared to be filmed outside Bucha’s town hall.

As the latest attempt to evacuate civilians from Mariupol fails, here’s a reminder why this humanitarian effort is so important.

Mariupol has been shelled almost continuously by Russian forces for several weeks, and 90% of its buildings have been damaged. At least 5,000 people have died.

Russian troops have so far been unable to capture the whole city, though there has been street fighting in central areas.

At least 150,000 civilians are thought to remain in the city, which before the war was inhabited by half a million people. They have no food, running water or power.

And here’s a line from Russia on the oil depot attack in Belgorod.

Russian Defence Ministry spokesman Igor Konashenkov told state news channel Rossiya 24 that the depot only supplied fuel for civilian transport – not military.

“The oil storage facility has nothing to do with the Russian armed forces,” he said.

Konashenkov said two Ukrainian Mi-24 helicopters entered Russia “at extremely low altitudes” at about 05:00 local times before carrying out a missile strike.

As we’ve just seen, Ukraine’s Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba said he could neither confirm or deny that Ukraine attacked an oil depot in Russia.

Now, Ukraine’s top security official has gone further – denying Ukrainian forces were behind the attack.

Ukraine’s Security Council Secretary Oleksiy Danilov told national television: “For some reason they say that we did it, but according to our information this does not correspond to reality.

As we’ve just seen, Ukraine’s Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba said he could neither confirm or deny that Ukraine attacked an oil depot in Russia.

Now, Ukraine’s top security official has gone further – denying Ukrainian forces were behind the attack.

Ukraine’s Security Council Secretary Oleksiy Danilov told national television: “For some reason they say that we did it, but according to our information this does not correspond to reality.

Ukraine can not confirm or deny oil depot attack in Russia

As we’ve been reporting, a Russian oil depot – near the Ukrainian border – is on fire after being struck by missiles.

If it was a Ukrainian attack, it would be the first known time Ukraine has flown into Russian airspace to attack.

Here’s Ukraine’s foreign minister Dmytro Kuleba being asked whether Kyiv was responsible

More now on the news that Russian troops have withdrawn from the now-defunct Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine, which they seized on 24 February – the first day of the war.

The mayor of Slavutych, the town where most of Chernobyl’s workers live, told the BBC that around 200 Ukrainian national guard members – who were among those stuck at the power plant while it was under Russian control – have likely been taken prisoner by the Russian troops as they left.

“We consider them prisoners of war,” Yuri Fomichev said, adding that they have been out of contact since Thursday. “We are working on a prisoner swap.”

It is not yet clear if Russian troops had left the entire Chernobyl exclusion zone, or just the immediate area around the power plant, Fomichev said.

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“The whole Chernobyl zone is very big. We can’t monitor it all – we only know what is happening directly around the power station where our workers are.”

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According to the mayor, the situation around the power plant is too uncertain to allow current workers at the site to be relieved by a new group of employees.

Chernobyl was the site of the world’s worst nuclear accident in 1986, when one of the reactors exploded.

A 4,000-sq-km (2,485 sq-mile) uninhabited exclusion zone was set up around the plant to protect the population from the radiation.

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